Home-brewed LED
Electroluminescence as a phenomenon was discovered in 1907 by the British experimenter H. J. Round of Marconi Labs, using a crystal of silicon carbide and a cat’s-whisker detector. Russian Oleg Losev reported creation of the first LED in 1927.
H.J Round had a piece of silicon carbide sitting around that he planned to use when making a primitive diode called a Cat’sWhisker Diode. While probing he noticed that one of the crystals threw off a bit of light. He popped it off and used JB Weld to attach it to a brass plate. The peculiar thing is that it generates light when power is run through it both forward and reverse biased.
Zoom Info
Home-brewed LED
Electroluminescence as a phenomenon was discovered in 1907 by the British experimenter H. J. Round of Marconi Labs, using a crystal of silicon carbide and a cat’s-whisker detector. Russian Oleg Losev reported creation of the first LED in 1927.
H.J Round had a piece of silicon carbide sitting around that he planned to use when making a primitive diode called a Cat’sWhisker Diode. While probing he noticed that one of the crystals threw off a bit of light. He popped it off and used JB Weld to attach it to a brass plate. The peculiar thing is that it generates light when power is run through it both forward and reverse biased.
Zoom Info
Home-brewed LED
Electroluminescence as a phenomenon was discovered in 1907 by the British experimenter H. J. Round of Marconi Labs, using a crystal of silicon carbide and a cat’s-whisker detector. Russian Oleg Losev reported creation of the first LED in 1927.
H.J Round had a piece of silicon carbide sitting around that he planned to use when making a primitive diode called a Cat’sWhisker Diode. While probing he noticed that one of the crystals threw off a bit of light. He popped it off and used JB Weld to attach it to a brass plate. The peculiar thing is that it generates light when power is run through it both forward and reverse biased.
Zoom Info

Home-brewed LED

Electroluminescence as a phenomenon was discovered in 1907 by the British experimenter H. J. Round of Marconi Labs, using a crystal of silicon carbide and a cat’s-whisker detector. Russian Oleg Losev reported creation of the first LED in 1927.

H.J Round had a piece of silicon carbide sitting around that he planned to use when making a primitive diode called a Cat’sWhisker Diode. While probing he noticed that one of the crystals threw off a bit of light. He popped it off and used JB Weld to attach it to a brass plate. The peculiar thing is that it generates light when power is run through it both forward and reverse biased.

Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info
Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 
[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]
In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.
[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]
I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626
Zoom Info

Electrocardiography is the recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Traditionally this is in the form of a transthoracic (across the thorax or chest) interpretation of the electrical activity of the heart over a period of time, as detected by electrodes attached to the surface of the skin and recorded or displayed by a device external to the body.[3] The recording produced by this noninvasive procedure is termed an electrocardiogram (also ECG or EKG). 

[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrocardiography ]

In 1902, Einthoven published the first ECG recorded on a string galvanometer. This instrument used a thin, silver-coated, quartz string stretched across a magnetic field. The heart’s electrical current caused the string to move from side to side, which could be recorded photographically.
Einthoven’s early machine weighed 600 pounds and required five people to operate it. It was located in his lab at Leiden University in the Netherlands. By using a telephone cable, Einthoven was later able to transmit ECGs from patients in the hospital to the lab. In the next few years, several hospitals set up “electrocardiographic stations.” Smaller machines were soon developed, and in 1909, the first string galvanometer was installed in the US.

[source: http://news.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002208260360]

I am planning to build an electrocardiograph using AD620 ICs, home-made electrodes and modified CRT as a display. 

http://www.google.com/patents/US3793626

DJMIX Musica Dispersa

01 – william burroughs – nothing here now
02 – andrea ferreiro – por adentro
03 – cabaret voltaire – sunday night in biot
04 – orfeon gagarin – why is arizona so dry
05 – eon/bdln – gl dat1
06 – em ramukin – modular 004
07 – alexei borisov – abstract 4
08 – das synthetische mischgewebe - the cold lie of pornography
09 – fiorella16 - libelulas
10 – louis pasteur - vielei ewnek stereoremix
11 – pharmakustik – vasopressor response
12 – scumearth - biomechanical
13 – rafael flores – piedra que habla
14 – toshifimu kawase - fetishism
15 – la otra cara de un jardin – busqueda de consuelo en los amaneceres frios
16 – susana lopez - vortex
17 – jardin – pequeña lulu
18 – fe<male fou – the end of evol
19 – lametafisica feat kreyk - vano
20 – rafael flores - die wallfahrt zum gnadenort
21 – monte cazazza – to mom on mothers day
22 – p16.d4 - untitled
23 – esplendor geometrico – estacion katowice
24 – ewa justka – excerpt live
25 – maurizio bianchi – track 02
26 – merzbow - amaroxes
27 – lcc - titan
28 – diseño corbusier – golpe de amistad
29 – tecnica material – a 1000 kilometros
30 – whitehouse – total sex
31 – william burroughs – nothing here now
32 – elisabeth welch – stormy weather

 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
Zoom Info
 
"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal&#8217;s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.
The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed &#8220;overtone modes&#8221;, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. &#8220;
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]
[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]
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"An oscillator crystal has two electrically conductive plates, with a slice or tuning fork of quartz crystal sandwiched between them. During startup, the controlling circuit places the crystal into an unstable equilibrium, and due to the positive feedback in the system, any tiny fraction of noise will start to get amplified, ramping up the oscillation. The crystal resonator can also be seen as a highly frequency-selective filter in this system: it will only pass a very narrow subband of frequencies around the resonant one, attenuating everything else. Eventually, only the resonant frequency will be active. As the oscillator amplifies the signals coming out of the crystal, the signals in the crystal’s frequency band will become stronger, eventually dominating the output of the oscillator. The narrow resonance band of the quartz crystal filters out all the unwanted frequencies.

The output frequency of a quartz oscillator can be either that of the fundamental resonance or of a multiple of that resonance, called a harmonic frequency. Harmonics are an exact integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. But, like many other mechanical resonators, crystals exhibit several modes of oscillation, usually at approximately odd integer multiples of the fundamental frequency. These are termed “overtone modes”, and oscillator circuits can be designed to excite them. The overtone modes are at frequencies which are approximate, but not exact odd integer multiples of that of the fundamental mode, and overtone frequencies are therefore not exact harmonics of the fundamental. “

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Resonance_modes]

[http://www.szjf.com/doce/index.php?support-default.html]

Discovery of Lissajous Figure, Jules Antoine Lissjous, 1857
"The Lissajous apparatus, a device that creates the figures that bear his name. In it, a beam of light is bounced off a mirror attached to a vibrating tuning fork, and then reflected off a second mirror attached to a perpendicularly oriented vibrating tuning fork (usually of a different pitch, creating a specific harmonic interval), onto a wall, resulting in a Lissajous figure. &#8220;
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Discovery of Lissajous Figure, Jules Antoine Lissjous, 1857
"The Lissajous apparatus, a device that creates the figures that bear his name. In it, a beam of light is bounced off a mirror attached to a vibrating tuning fork, and then reflected off a second mirror attached to a perpendicularly oriented vibrating tuning fork (usually of a different pitch, creating a specific harmonic interval), onto a wall, resulting in a Lissajous figure. &#8220;
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Discovery of Lissajous Figure, Jules Antoine Lissjous, 1857
"The Lissajous apparatus, a device that creates the figures that bear his name. In it, a beam of light is bounced off a mirror attached to a vibrating tuning fork, and then reflected off a second mirror attached to a perpendicularly oriented vibrating tuning fork (usually of a different pitch, creating a specific harmonic interval), onto a wall, resulting in a Lissajous figure. &#8220;
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Discovery of Lissajous Figure, Jules Antoine Lissjous, 1857
"The Lissajous apparatus, a device that creates the figures that bear his name. In it, a beam of light is bounced off a mirror attached to a vibrating tuning fork, and then reflected off a second mirror attached to a perpendicularly oriented vibrating tuning fork (usually of a different pitch, creating a specific harmonic interval), onto a wall, resulting in a Lissajous figure. &#8220;
Zoom Info
Discovery of Lissajous Figure, Jules Antoine Lissjous, 1857
"The Lissajous apparatus, a device that creates the figures that bear his name. In it, a beam of light is bounced off a mirror attached to a vibrating tuning fork, and then reflected off a second mirror attached to a perpendicularly oriented vibrating tuning fork (usually of a different pitch, creating a specific harmonic interval), onto a wall, resulting in a Lissajous figure. &#8220;
Zoom Info
Discovery of Lissajous Figure, Jules Antoine Lissjous, 1857
"The Lissajous apparatus, a device that creates the figures that bear his name. In it, a beam of light is bounced off a mirror attached to a vibrating tuning fork, and then reflected off a second mirror attached to a perpendicularly oriented vibrating tuning fork (usually of a different pitch, creating a specific harmonic interval), onto a wall, resulting in a Lissajous figure. &#8220;
Zoom Info

Discovery of Lissajous Figure, Jules Antoine Lissjous, 1857

"The Lissajous apparatus, a device that creates the figures that bear his name. In it, a beam of light is bounced off a mirror attached to a vibrating tuning fork, and then reflected off a second mirror attached to a perpendicularly oriented vibrating tuning fork (usually of a different pitch, creating a specific harmonic interval), onto a wall, resulting in a Lissajous figure. “

Musica Dispersa An International Compilation of Experimental Music Vol.01

Musica Dispersa An International Compilation of Experimental Music Vol.01 CD Digipack included in a plastic bag especially designed and a 12-page booklet. All tracks remastered. Tracklist includeAndrea Ferreiro (Mexico) Dum Dum TV (Japan) Esplendor Geometrico (Spain)
Ewa Justka (Poland) Fe>Male Fou (Italy) Fiorella 16 (Peru) Javier Piñango (Spain) Rafael Flores (Spain) Susana Lopez (Spain) Uanamami Musica (Spain).
The booklet also included texts by Fernando Cifuentes and art work and graphic desing by Roberto Vilela and Aya Uchimura plus info of all artists and label.
Release Date: June 2014
Launch Party: Info Soon

1) Chua&#8217;s Circuit &amp; Loren&#8217;z Attractor [non-linear electronics]: &#8220;an attractor is a set of physical properties toward which a system tends to evolve, regardless of the starting conditions of the system. Property values that get close enough to the attractor values remain close even if slightly disturbed.&#8221;
&#8220;Lorenz attractor is a set of chaotic solutions of the Lorenz system which, when plotted, resemble a butterfly or figure eight.&#8221;
2) Displaying electromagnetic field 
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1) Chua&#8217;s Circuit &amp; Loren&#8217;z Attractor [non-linear electronics]: &#8220;an attractor is a set of physical properties toward which a system tends to evolve, regardless of the starting conditions of the system. Property values that get close enough to the attractor values remain close even if slightly disturbed.&#8221;
&#8220;Lorenz attractor is a set of chaotic solutions of the Lorenz system which, when plotted, resemble a butterfly or figure eight.&#8221;
2) Displaying electromagnetic field 
Zoom Info
1) Chua&#8217;s Circuit &amp; Loren&#8217;z Attractor [non-linear electronics]: &#8220;an attractor is a set of physical properties toward which a system tends to evolve, regardless of the starting conditions of the system. Property values that get close enough to the attractor values remain close even if slightly disturbed.&#8221;
&#8220;Lorenz attractor is a set of chaotic solutions of the Lorenz system which, when plotted, resemble a butterfly or figure eight.&#8221;
2) Displaying electromagnetic field 
Zoom Info
1) Chua&#8217;s Circuit &amp; Loren&#8217;z Attractor [non-linear electronics]: &#8220;an attractor is a set of physical properties toward which a system tends to evolve, regardless of the starting conditions of the system. Property values that get close enough to the attractor values remain close even if slightly disturbed.&#8221;
&#8220;Lorenz attractor is a set of chaotic solutions of the Lorenz system which, when plotted, resemble a butterfly or figure eight.&#8221;
2) Displaying electromagnetic field 
Zoom Info
1) Chua&#8217;s Circuit &amp; Loren&#8217;z Attractor [non-linear electronics]: &#8220;an attractor is a set of physical properties toward which a system tends to evolve, regardless of the starting conditions of the system. Property values that get close enough to the attractor values remain close even if slightly disturbed.&#8221;
&#8220;Lorenz attractor is a set of chaotic solutions of the Lorenz system which, when plotted, resemble a butterfly or figure eight.&#8221;
2) Displaying electromagnetic field 
Zoom Info
1) Chua&#8217;s Circuit &amp; Loren&#8217;z Attractor [non-linear electronics]: &#8220;an attractor is a set of physical properties toward which a system tends to evolve, regardless of the starting conditions of the system. Property values that get close enough to the attractor values remain close even if slightly disturbed.&#8221;
&#8220;Lorenz attractor is a set of chaotic solutions of the Lorenz system which, when plotted, resemble a butterfly or figure eight.&#8221;
2) Displaying electromagnetic field 
Zoom Info

1) Chua’s Circuit & Loren’z Attractor [non-linear electronics]: “an attractor is a set of physical properties toward which a system tends to evolve, regardless of the starting conditions of the system. Property values that get close enough to the attractor values remain close even if slightly disturbed.”

Lorenz attractor is a set of chaotic solutions of the Lorenz system which, when plotted, resemble a butterfly or figure eight.”

2) Displaying electromagnetic field 

3 Electronicas at De Player, Rotterdam (full performance)

Poulomi Desai (sitar), Lorah Pierre and Ewa Justka (electronics and lights)

3 ELECtronicA’S” hijacked the lighting and sound systems of De Player in Rotterdam and created a twisted, noise, son et lumière. Hacking, bending, pulsing darkroom electronics in a filmic ambience, creating audio-visual hypnagogic illusions. 3 artists characterised by the fact that they develop their own electronic devices for the use of making sound in a sculptural and performative way. Thanks to De Player and special thanks to Peter Fengler.

3 Electronicas at De Player, Rotterdam (extract) 

Poulomi Desai (sitar), Lorah Pierre and Ewa Justka (electronics and lights)